All Posts By

Ben Tatlock

America’s Test Kitchen cooking show protected from the dangers of CO

By | AGS, American Gas Safety, Industry News

America’s Test Kitchen is the most watched cooking show on public television – more than 2 million viewers tune in each week – and in January 2017, America’s Test Kitchen will launch its 17th season with hosts Bridget Lancaster and Julia Collin Davison. Bridget and Julia have been fixtures on the show from the very beginning, sharing their cooking skills and deep knowledge of food with viewers over the hundred of recipes they’ve prepared on air as tests cooks. Now, they’re heading into the test kitchen to bring you equipment reviews, taste tests, and recipes for the home cook.

They moved this summer to a new state of the art studios in Boston, MA and AGS is now protecting their 55 professional test cooks from the dangers of CO.

If you require carbon monoxide protection in your premises please do not hesitate to contact AGS, the leading manufacturer of gas safety systems in America. ben@americangassafety.com or call (727)-608-4375.

 

California Dreaming

By | American Gas Safety

Our AGS rep for California the “George Yardley Company” recently visited a MEP firm in downtown Los Angeles.

Rob Yardley pictured below, found a great photo opportunity to showcase our Utility controller whilst in the reception area. Both our family businesses have a great relationship, which will continue to grow for many years to come. If you would like Rob to photo bomb your reception area or provide a demonstration on the latest Utility Gas Shut off systems please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

Lake Sumter State College refurbishments for gas safety

By | American Gas Safety

Lake Sumter State College have now installed multiple Merlin 1000SW+i utility systems in their science classrooms

Over the past few weeks huge refurbishments have taken place across the college, including the Health Science building where our Merlin 1000SW+i have been installed. This work was carried out by a company named S I Goldman, a mechanical contractor based in Longwood Florida who have done an excellent job in installing our equipment.

The system installed is our Merlin 1000SW+i, which controls Gas, Water and Electric within the science laboratories. This system has built in connectivity allowing the panel to communicate with the schools BMS and has connections for the buildings existing fire alarm system. The panel can either tell the BMS that the gas is “ON” or “OFF” or with the flick of a switch on the internal control panel it can tell the BMS that the panel has gone into “Alarm”, high concentrations of CO2, gas leak detected or that an EM stop has been actuated. An example of one of the rooms where our Merlin 1000SW+i is installed at the LSSC is pictured below.

For more information on our Merlin range of utility controllers, please see our website www.americangassafety.com or call the office on (727)608-4375 where one of our sales team will be more than willing to help.

1 Dead and Several Injured after a Carbon Monoxide leak at hotel pool

By | American Gas Safety

A teenage boy has died and 14 other people were hospitalized after guests at a southern Michigan hotel were found unconscious around an indoor pool due to carbon monoxide poisoning.

The injured 14 were taken to a local hospital and upon arrival one person was ‘confirmed dead’ according to Jessica Hines, a spokeswoman for Lakeland Hospital. The Niles Police Department identified the deceased as 13-year-old Bryan Douglas Watts of Niles. Eight other children were taken to Memorial Hospital in South Bend, Indiana, police said. Three were released by Saturday evening and the other five were reported in good condition Sunday at noon.

Nile Fire Department Captain Don Wise attributed the incident to a faulty pool heater. “The ventilation system on the heater had issues. The exhaust was not functioning properly,” said Wise. “Our mechanical inspector verified that. The hotel is shut down until repairs are made.”

Police said that, when they arrived, carbon monoxide levels at the hotel were 800 parts per million, according to CNN Affiliate WBND-TV. US standards for carbon monoxide are 35 parts per million for a one-hour exposure.

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas that is produced when a fuel is burned. When too much carbon monoxide is in the air, it can replace the oxygen in red blood cells and can also lead to tissue damage or death. According to the police, the hotel’s poolroom had no carbon monoxide detectors which we at American Gas Safety see as a life threatening risk.

Full details of the news coverage can be found on the following link http://edition.cnn.com/2017/04/01/us/michigan-carbon-monoxide-poisoning/index.html

32 treated after Carbon Monoxide forces evacuation of NYC building

By | American Gas Safety

High levels of carbon monoxide spewed by a faulty oil burner that caught fire in the basement of a Lower Manhattan apartment building has sickened 32 people this Tuesday morning, according to the Fire Department.

All 12 stories of the building between Murray Street and Park Place, along West Broadway, were evacuated. The fire, which was reported around 8:30 a.m., grew to a two-alarm fire by 9 a.m. By mid morning, 25 fire vehicles and 106 firefighters were on the scene. The incident occurred in the basement of the Amish Market, a grocery store in the building.

This potentially life threatening incident could have been prevented by using one of our Carbon Monoxide Detectors, which will provide an audible and visual alarm if the levels rise to a dangerous level. Our Carbon Monoxide detectors will also close the gas solenoid valve preventing further use of gas in the building until the levels reach a safe level, therefore avoiding any additional safety hazards. For a full range of Utility control solutions please contact American Gas Safety direct or visit our website www.americangassafety.com

Full details of the news coverage can be found on the following link http://abcnews.go.com/US/32-treated-carbon-monoxide-forces-evacuation-nyc-building/story?id=48004740